I always welcome the opportunity to talk to the public about the work I do and about paleontology in general. Below are some examples of outreach work I have performed over the years.

2018

St. Louis Science Center

I was invited to talk about my work at the St. Louis Science Center's annual SciFest. Their theme that year was titled: Engineering our World. I had the opportunity to interact with many engaged kids and showcase some of what paleontology can do.

2017

Local school visits

I had the opportunity to visit the classrooms of the teachers that I worked with for the Student's Discover series, and help them work on their dinosaur-themed projects, as well as give insight into what it is like to be a paleontologist.

Reptile and Amphibian Day

I was able to contribute a talk to the NCMNS's annual Reptile and Amphibian Day. Their theme this year was sea turtles. My talk showcased how diverse turtles have been over their evolutionary history.

2016

The Digital Dinos Project

Working with a talented group of NC State undergraduates, we created a "proof of concept" website where members of the public could go to help collect data on bone morphology. The site allowed users to manipulate 3D models of bones and place digital landmarks on the bones. These data were then recorded and stored in a database that researchers could download and use in future statistical analyses on bone shape over time.

Students Discover

Using a grant awarded to the NCMNS and NC State by the National Science Foundation, I worked on a project called: Students Discover. In this project, I teamed up with middle school teachers from around the North Carolina region. The teachers got to experience what it was like to work in a paleontology lab, and together, we created a middle school curriculum that incorporated paleontology in the classroom and allowed the students to acquire data that they could send back to us for future projects.

The Digital Dinos Project

Working with a talented group of NC State undergraduates, we created a "proof of concept" website where members of the public could go to help collect data on bone morphology. The site allowed users to manipulate 3D models of bones and place digital landmarks on the bones. These data were then recorded and stored in a database that researchers could download and use in future statistical analyses on bone shape over time.

Students Discover

Using a grant awarded to the NCMNS and NC State by the National Science Foundation, I worked on a project called: Students Discover. In this project, I teamed up with middle school teachers from around the North Carolina region. The teachers got to experience what it was like to work in a paleontology lab, and together, we created a middle school curriculum that incorporated paleontology in the classroom and allowed the students to acquire data that they could send back to us for future projects.

2015

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

Working as a postdoc in the ZannoLab at the NCMNS, I was able to present my research to a diverse audience of museum goers at the NCMNS's Daily Planet theatre. I also provided guided tours of the ZannoLab, showcasing the many discoveries the lab had uncovered in their years of fossil hunting in the outskirts of Utah.

Citizen Science

Working with a talented group of scientists lead by ecologist, Rob Dunn, I introduced budding scientists to the concept of data collection for the ongoing Shark Tooth Forensics project.

2013

Young Scholars Ohio

 

This year saw a return of the Young Scholars Ohio program to Ohio University. Once again I helped the WitmerLab give gifted children from around the country, the chance to to see what life is like working in a paleontology lab.

2012

Ohio Valley Museum of Discovery

 

Working with the WitmerLab I helped showcase the diversity seen in dinosaurs along with how much we can learn from the fossils. Children were given a chance to ask questions and interact wth casts of many dinosaur species.

Visible Interactive Iguana

 

I worked extensively with a talented pre-med student to segment out an iguana skull. From there we made interactive 3D PDFs and a movie showcasing all the bones of the skull. The data from this project are freely available for everyone at the Visible Interactive Iguana webpage.

2011

The Visible Interactive Ostrich

 

Working closely with a talented undergraduate in the lab, we put together a 3D PDF and movies featuring the first digitally available data for the skull and some of the associated soft tissues in an ostrich (Struthio camelus). Data have been made freely accessible at the WitmerLab Visible Interactive Ostrich page.

Young Scholars Ohio

 

Working as a member of the WitmerLab I contributed to the education of the Young Scholars Ohio Program. This program took gifted children from around the country and gave them the opportunity to see what life is like working in a paleontology lab.

2010

Young Scholars Ohio

 

Working as a member of the WitmerLab I contributed to the education of the Young Scholars Ohio Program. This program took gifted children from around the country and gave them the opportunity to see what life is like working in a paleontology lab.

The Visible Interactive Alligator

 

This was a collaborative project that the WitmerLab was doing with the Holliday Lab. The result was an interactive 3D model of a hatchling and adult American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). I worked on the hatchling, separating the skull into its respective bones. I also created videos that showcased the anatomy. All these data are freely available now at the Visible Interactive Anatomy website.